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By Elizabeth Foyster, Christopher Whatley

The studies of daily Scotland has gone through profound political, spiritual, and fiscal switch during the last centuries. This staff of authors learn how some distance the extreme has impinged at the Scottish traditional and the level to which inhabitants development, urbanization, agricultural advancements, and political and spiritual upheaval have impacted the day-by-day styles, rhythms, and rituals of universal humans. The authors discover a wealth of unusual aspect in regards to the anxieties, joys, comforts, passions, hopes, and fears of Scots, tracing how the impression of swap varies in line with geographical place, social place, and gender. The authors draw on a large and eclectic diversity of fundamental and secondary assets, together with the fabric is still of city and state existence. additionally consulted are artifacts of presidency, faith, principles, portray, literature, and structure, delivering clean perception into how Scots communicated with one another, understood themselves, controlled social clash, and coped with ailment and demise.

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A History of Everyday Life in Scotland, 1600-1800

The reports of daily Scotland has gone through profound political, non secular, and monetary switch during the last centuries. This group of authors learn how a ways the intense has impinged at the Scottish traditional and the level to which inhabitants development, urbanization, agricultural advancements, and political and spiritual upheaval have impacted the day-by-day styles, rhythms, and rituals of universal humans.

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Extra resources for A History of Everyday Life in Scotland, 1600-1800

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Thus, it was also in the eighteenth century that we have clearest evidence of the importance of place and locality to everyday life in Scotland. Notes 1. S. Johnson, A Journey to the Western Isles of Scotland, J. D. ) (Oxford [1775] 1985), p. 16. 2. C. W. J. Withers, Geography, Science and National Identity: Scotland Since 1520 (Cambridge, 2001), pp. 142–57. 3. See, for example, P. Cadell, ‘The Reverend John Brand and the Bo’ness of the 1690s’, in G. ), A Sense of Place: Studies in Scottish Local History (Edinburgh, 1988), pp.

289–303. Introduction 25 58. See A. ), The History of Scottish Literature, Volume 2, 1660–1800 (Aberdeen, 1987). 59. D. J. Patrick, ‘Unconventional procedure: Scottish electoral politics after the Revolution’, in K. B. Brown and A. J. Mann (eds), Parliament and Politics in Scotland, 1567–1707 (Edinburgh, 2005), pp. 211, 242–44. 60. C. A. Whatley, The Scots and the Union (Edinburgh, 2007 edn), pp. 7–8. 61. K. M. Brown, Kingdom or Province? Scotland and the Regal Union, 1603–1715 (Basingstoke, 1992), pp.

55 Yet there was a dip in cultural achievement, with court-sponsored drama in particular being all but silenced by the disapproving Presbyterian kirk. 56 Or at least they tried to. 57 There was something of a return to the much-missed joyfulness associated with the Stuart court at the time of the Restoration of Charles II – and the reemergence of some Catholic practices in and around Aberdeen. A resurgence of sponsorship of the arts and learning followed the residence in Edinburgh from 1679 of the king’s brother, the duke of York (the future James VII and II).

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